Tag Archives: crime fiction

Beautiful Mona …

Enjoyed the wonderful wildlife and fauna paintings by local artist, Charles Tunnicliffe (who illustrated Tarka the Otter) plus some wonderful photographs of Holyhead, past and present, at the Brick Shed Gallery at the Breakwater Country Park this weekend. Top marks to everyone involved in the project, it’s hardly recognisable as the same abandoned old quarry I played in as a child!

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Welsh Valentines Day – 25th January

Last weekend (25th Jan) was St Dwynen’s day, celebrated as the saint’s day of lovers in Wales. http://bit.ly/1emy7Go – the site of the chapel set up in St Dwynen’s name is the main location for my novel, Closure. Llanddwyn Island is a headland, rather than island, that juts out into the Menai Straits opposite Caernarfon. As well as the ruins of the chapel, there are celtic crosses, pilot boat cottages and lots of mysterious lumps and bumps. Well worth a visit. And as you can see from the cover, it was the inspiration for the location of my second published novel, Closure, available as Kindle, paperback or audiobook. http://amzn.to/1yrggrl
Closure_Cover_ACX

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Last 48 hours to get The Charter at only 99p/c !

Fancy a spooky #Anglesey based thriller to read over the weekend? The Charter is only 99p / 99c for Kindle until 5th Jan. Don’t miss it!

http://amzn.to/1BgtBGo

The Charter

The Charter

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Goodreads Giveaway – last two days! Signed copy of Complicit!

Goodreads Giveaway running for a signed paperback of Complicit until 5th Jan. If you’re a member, pop over and enter to win!

https://www.goodreads.com/giveaway/show/121007-complicit

Complicit

Complicit

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Coming soon …. Closure on audio!

Really excited to hear Closure on audiobook, expertly narrated by Catherine O’Brien, I can’t wait to release it to Audible!

Closure_Cover_ACX

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Review for Crimson Shore

If you’ve not tried my new novel, Crimson Shore, the first book in The Gold Detective series, have a read of this review from an Amazon Top 500 reviewer – it may persuade you to give it a try!

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“Crimson Shore sees a new departure for this author, who has with her previous books made an impact with cross-genre crime fiction. However, in this new series of procedural crime novels the focus is more on the dynamics of an active crime office, and the back room banter between close knit colleagues allows a fascinating glimpse into the pressures they face, not just in their daily work, but also within their personal lives.

When a series of unexplained dead bodies start to show up on the peaceful island of Anglesey in North Wales, the Bangor CID team, headed by DI Amanda Gold, have the devil’s own job in trying to keep one step ahead of a murderer who leaves virtually no evidence behind. With precious little to go on, DS Dara Brennan and DS Kelly Jones are left struggling, not just with a series of complex murder cases but also with their growing attraction to each other. As with any new series there is much to take in, the mechanism of a bustling CID office and the repartee between colleagues is done with a realistic understanding of the vagaries of police hierarchy, however, it is the journey into the mind of a killer where the story really starts to bite.

Placing a series of gritty crime novels in this peaceful corner of North Wales is an inspired choice of location, and this quiet, or maybe not so quiet little island really comes to life under the watchful eye of this talented author. However, don’t be fooled by the idyllic setting, as this story is by no stretch of the imagination either tranquil or cosy crime; there is a brutal killer on the loose and as the hard hitting violent behaviour thumps you into taking notice, very soon you start to jump at shadows and you see evil in every hidden corner.

I read Crimson Shore over the space of twenty four hours as I couldn’t tear myself away from it and was gripped by the sheer competence of an author who leads you gently by the hand into the presence of pure evil, and believe me, to have a safe pair of hands to hold in this novel is very comforting indeed.

I am sure that this is the start of a commendable crime series and I am already eager to catch up with DI Amanda Gold’s CID team in the, hopefully, not too distant future.”

Available from Amazon

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Anglesey Photo of the Week Competition

Over on my author Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Gillian-E-Hamer/279383198798678?ref_type=bookmark) I’ve been running a weekly competition with the chance to win an e-book of your choice for the winner.

Simply name the Anglesey beauty spot and pick your novel!

There’s no winner so far this week, so if you think you know where the photo below was taken, follow me over on Facebook and name the spot!

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Goodreads Giveaway – Complicit

For any members of Goodreads, my latest novel, Complicit, has a giveaway running until 16 November for a chance to win one of three signed copies of the book. Click below to enter and spread the word!

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https://www.goodreads.com/giveaway/show/69197-complicit

 

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Summer Reads (5) … Hunting Shadows by Sheila Bugler

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For more details visit www.sheilabugler.com

I’m proud to introduce a new name to crime fiction, Sheila Bugler. Her Irish themed, London set, crime series featuring DI Ellen Kelly has been launched to the world, and has already received some wonderful reviews from big names in literature such as Ken Bruen.

I have known Sheila through writing circles, and later as a firm friend, for many years – and I know how hard she has worked to develop what is a God-given gift into a published work of fiction of which she can be proud.

Hunting Shadows in number five in my Summer Reads list – and it’s a five star review below and a recommendation for everyone to read this latest name in crime writing.

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Lee, southeast London. A young girl has disappeared. There are no  witnesses, no leads, no clues. The police are tracking a shadow, and time is  running out … DI Ellen Kelly is at the top of her game – at least she was, until  she took the law into her own hands and confronted her husband’s killer. Now  she’s back at work, leading the investigation into the missing child. Her  superiors are watching her; the distraught family is depending on her. Ellen has  a lot to prove. And she knows it. A tense thriller that stalks the urban streets  of southeast London and the bleak wilderness of the North Kent coast, Hunting  Shadows introduces the forceful, compromised police detective, DI Ellen  Kelly.

A wonderful book by a talented author. I love crime fiction and have read hundreds of crime novels in my life. I can honestly say I find it hard to believe this novel is a debut – as it’s written with a confidence and maturity that belies years of practise and experience – or a God-given gift.

It opens with a child’s abduction, sensitively handled, and cleverly seen from the viewpoint of both the abductor and abductee. Handling a variety of characters, POVs and voices is no mean feat for a writer, but soon I found I hardly noticed the writing – and that is meant as a compliment. When the change in style from six-year-old girl to a mentally disturbed young man passes without a single question about the authenticity of voice or believability of character – then you know you’re in safe hands.

The victim’s family, in particular the grieving step-father, are described in such detailed accuracy, that we can not help but feel their pain and sympathise with the injustice meted out by an unsympathetic Met police whose priority has to be the missing child. I loved how the complex themes of loss, revenge and forgiveness were woven expertly into the narrative and added real depth to the story.

Hunting Shadows is the first book in a series, and here we are introduced to DI Ellen Kelly, recently back in the force following the death of her husband and a painful history of recrimination. Ellen is a complex, well-rounded and instantly likeable character whom the author handles with skill. Ellen’s Irish roots shine through (no doubt aided by the author’s own Irish background) and it’s not long into the book before her whole family and history feel as at home to us as our own.

The plot and pace is handled superbly, clever twists and turns lead us one way and then the next, resulting in a terrifying page-turning conclusion that left me gripped.

 

Hunting Shadows is available in paperback and e-book from major suppliers and can be found at Amazon here.

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Summer Read (4) – Standing in Another Man’s Grave by Ian Rankin

Image5 Out of 5 Stars

Rebus is back! Retirement doesn’t suit him despite his best attempts. Here we see him in his new position in SRCU (Edinburgh’s version of a cold case team) – and as usual his mixture of curmudgeonly stubbornness and genuine insightfulness work both for and against his career.

Through a case that appears to have links with a current CID investigation, Rebus is teamed up with Siobhan Clarke – and in my opinion this novel is all the more stronger because of it. Clarke is one of the only people who understands at least part of Rebus’s psyche and can connect with him in a way no one else can. Malcolm Fox (from The Complaints division) also makes a comeback here, but I’m glad to say his miserable and cynical interference is kept to a minimum, and we’re left feeling it can’t be long before he gets his comeuppance once and for all.

Rebus and Clarke form an understanding, so Rebus has enough space and freedom to work his usual magic. He links a series of cold case disappearances of young women to a current case, and when the connection seems to be the busy A9 commuter route, Rebus’s instincts again lead him off the beaten track, asking questions where other detectives would fear to pry. The only consistent clue is a photo of an unknown remote location taken on each victim’s camera phones. So, Rebus is forced to leave the security of Edinburgh and venture out into the wilds of Scotland to track down the truth behind the killer’s message. The storyline is well paced and the ending superb; a real message to all crime buffs how to do crime well.

There’s something about Ian Rankin’s writing that always consumes me from the opening page. There’s a saying about the real art in anything is being to make something incredibly hard seem incredible easy – and that’s certainly true here. Rankin has a balance of confidence, pace, superb location, precision of narrative and wonderful detail of characterisation that at makes you forget you’re reading fiction and really believe you’ve been swallowed up in a true-life crime investigation. I have always loved Rebus’s wit and there are even more funny moments in this novel to enjoy. The dialogue is effortless and there’s never a second that something feels unreal or out of context. For me, that’s the sign of a truly gifted writer.

And as an added bonus, in this novel, the author brings alive some wonderful settings – whether it’s the traffic-jammed streets of Edinburgh or the backdrop of the Black Isle, it’s impossible not to have a running mental image in your head. Rankin’s pride of his own country is obvious.

I’ve always been a huge fan of Rankin’s writing, and even after twenty-five years of John Rebus, I never tire of his character. And Rankin never fails to keep the storylines fresh and engaging. There are twists and turns, dead ends and brick walls a-plenty here, but you’re never left in a shadow of doubt that it will all come good for Rebus in the end.

Exceptional writing and one of my best reads of the summer.

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